Investigating Migrants Adaptation Process through Gardening Practices in Community Gardens

  • Imas Agustina Melbourne School of Land and Environment, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
  • Ruth Beilin Department of Resource Management and Geography, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia

Abstract


Investigation approach to migrants adaptation process in host countries has always been placed specific, in order to understand the whole connections to all aspect of life. In Melbourne, community gardens have been a place where immigrants start their interaction with others. The literature argues that the gardens can foster social inclusion, while at the same time providing space to preserve their cultural identity. This paper will investigate the adaptation of migrants within the garden setting, by considering the extent to which cultural practices in gardening affect their ability to adapt to the host country (Australia). The findings confirm a complex relationship between historical garden practices/culture and the reality of practices in the community gardens.


Keywords: self-built housing, donated housing, lifestyle, social interaction, adjustments


eISSN 2514-751X © 2018. The Authors. Published for AMER ABRA cE-Bs by e-International Publishing House, Ltd., UK. This is an open-access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Peer–review under responsibility of AMER (Association of Malaysian Environment-Behaviour Researchers), ABRA (Association of Behavioural Researchers on Asians) and cE-Bs (Centre for Environment-Behaviour Studies), Faculty of Architecture, Planning & Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.

Published
2018-01-02
How to Cite
AGUSTINA, Imas; BEILIN, Ruth. Investigating Migrants Adaptation Process through Gardening Practices in Community Gardens. Asian Journal of Environment-Behaviour Studies, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 6, p. 121-130, jan. 2018. ISSN 2514-751X. Available at: <https://aje-bs.e-iph.co.uk/index.php/ajE-Bs/article/view/242>. Date accessed: 22 jan. 2018. doi: https://doi.org/10.21834/aje-bs.v3i6.242.
Section
Articles

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